Welcome to MA 123 in Spring 2023

Elementary Calculus at the University of Kentucky

Course Description

This course is an introduction to differential and integral calculus, with applications to business and the biological and physical sciences. We cover differentiation of rational, radical, and exponential functions, integration as area, and using the fundamental theorem of calculus to integrate certain elementary functions. We cover applications to increasing and decreasing functions, concavity, optimization, marginal cost, and others.


This website contains almost all the information you will need this semester, including the official text for the course, contact information for your instructors, policies for grades and absences, worksheets used during recitations, important dates and deadlines, and more.

Learning Outcomes

This course will emphasize computational and modeling aspects of mathematics. The course will also require you to effectively communicate your solutions. This means that by the end of the semester you should be able to: setup application or word problems, explain the result of a computation, interpret formulas or processes, and clearly communicate your solution process, in addition to getting the "right" answer.

The web homework is only capable of testing your computational ability. Discussion questions, recommended readings, and other provided materials will help develop your modeling and mathematical communication skills.

Upon successful completion of the course, the student should be able to

  1. Evaluate limits of functions given graphically or algebraically;
  2. Compute derivatives of algebraic, logarithmic and exponential functions, and combinations of these functions;
  3. Interpret the derivative as a rate of change, and solve related application problems;
  4. Use the first and second derivatives to analyze the graphs of functions, to find the maximum and minimum values of a function, and to solve related application problems;
  5. Interpret the definite integral in terms of area, and solve related application problems;
  6. Integrate selected functions, and apply the fundamental theorem of calculus to evaluate definite integrals.

Students will improve with regard to the following mathematical practices.

  1. Students will make sense of problems and be persistent while solving them.
  2. Students will engage in productive struggle with mathematics problems.
  3. Students will productively collaborate with others.
  4. Students will communicate through mathematical writing.

Course policy regarding supportive discourse. Students are not allowed to make negative comments about themselves or their mathematical ability, at any time, for any reason. Here are example statements that are banned, along with acceptable replacement phrases.

  • I can't do this ->; I am still learning how to do this
  • That was stupid ->; That was a productive mistake
  • This is impossible ->; There is something interesting and subtle in this problem
  • I'm an idiot ->; This is going to take careful thought
  • I'll never understand this ->; This might take me a long time and a lot of work to figure out
  • This is terrible ->; I think I've done something incorrectly, let me check it again
The banned phrases represent having a fixed view of your own intelligence, which does not reflect the reality that you are all capable of dynamic, continued learning. The suggested replacement phrases support and represent having a realistic perspective regarding your abilities and your capacity for improvement.

Instructor Information



Instructor Mathskeller and Office Hours


Last Name Mathskeller Hours Office Hours
Ciasullo W 3-4pm M 10-11am, R 9:30-10:30am
Effinger R 1-2pm R 11am-1pm
Emmons T 3-4pm M 8-9am, F 9-10am
Franchere R 9-10am M 11am-12pm, T 2-3pm
Fritz R 2-3pm T 2-3pm, W 8-9am
McCarver T 4-5pm W 1-2pm, R 2-3pm
Reed M 10-11am T 3:30-4:30pm, R 9-10am
Rivera R 2-3pm M 4-5pm, T 2-3pm
Rogers T 10-11am T 2-3pm, R 12:30-1:30pm

Refer to your Canvas home page for your instructor's office hours.

Textbook

Detailed notes with the plan for each chapter have been written in order to assist you throughout the course. They will be used as a primary means of instruction.

We recommend that you review the lecture notes before attempting the homework. It is best to treat the original copy as a worksheet, fill in what answers you can, and only consult the versions with answers to check your work or if you get stuck.

There are also links to video lectures of each example in the course text starting with Chapter 2.

This course has about 160 pages of lecture notes and recitation worksheets. These pages can be printed on campus printers for about 12 cents per page, (see UK's IT site for current pricing information) which would total a bit less than $20. You might prefer to consider the following other alternatives:

  1. You can use your private printer to print the pages.
  2. You can view the notes on your own computer.

Other Resources

Calculators

You will need a calculator for the homework and exams. We allow the same calculators as the ACT allows. You may not use any machine (carbon-based life form or silicon-based) that has symbolic manipulation capabilities of any sort on any exam. This precludes the use of TI-89, TI-Nspire CAS, HP 48, TI 92, Voyage 200, Casio Classpad or laptop computer. Also, you may not use your mobile phone, iPhone or Blackberry on any exam even if you forget your regular calculator. If it runs Android, GEOS, iOS, Linux, MacOS, PalmOS, Ubuntu, Unix, Windows, or similar operating systems, you cannot use it on the exams. Answers that are simply the output of a calculator routine or a single numerical or symbolic expression that has no supporting work will receive no credit on exams.

Policies

Recitation:

The recitation/participation points will be awarded for actively engaging in discussions in recitation, performance on worksheets, and performance on quizzes. Each recitation instructor will provide a handout on the first day explaining the polices and grading specific to their sections.


Excused Absences:

Excused absences are granted according to University Senate Rule 5.2.5.2, which defines the following as acceptable reasons for excused absences: serious illness; illness or death of family member; University-related trips; major religious holidays.

The procedure for handling an absence varies based on whether you are missing an exam or a recitation class.

Missing an exam:

Absences from exams should be reported (in advance) on this form. Students who have university excused absences or who have university-scheduled class conflicts with uniform examinations need to make arrangements to take exam at an alternate time. According to university policy, it is the student's responsibility to resolve scheduling conflicts with common hour exams, and this must be done at least TWO WEEKS before the exam. If you fail to inform your instructor of exam conflicts in timely manner, a penalty may be assessed on your exam score and you will be required to take the exam at one of the already scheduled alternate exam times. To avoid any problems request alternate exams here as soon as you know you may have a conflict.

If you do not inform your instructor or fill out the alternate exam form until after the scheduled exam date, a penalty of 5% will be assessed on your exam score for each day after the exam date that you do not communicate your absence.

No final exams will be given before Wednesday, May 3 at 6pm.

Missing a recitation class:

Recitation attendance is required. Because recitation meets only once a week, you should make every effort to attend. For policies about handling excused absences, see your recitation instructor for details. Contact information is on the Sections and Instructors page. Generally, you will be required to make up the work you miss within a week of the absence.


Disability Accommodations:

If you have documented disability that requires academic accommodations, please see your lecturer as soon as possible during scheduled office hours. In order to receive accommodations in this course, you must provide a Letter of Accommodation from the Disability Resource Center (Suite 407, Multidisciplinary Science Building, 859-257-2754, email address drc@uky.edu) for coordination of campus disability services available to students with disabilities. The letter must be submitted at 7 business days prior to the date you wish to use your accommodations. Instructors will require an electronic version of the accomodation letter which you can download by logging into your account with the DRC.


Academic Integrity, Honesty, and Cheating:

You should feel free to study with friends, but any work you submit for a grade should be your own work. This applies to all exams, quizzes, and writing assignments, with the exception of assignments that are specifically designated as group assignments. Academic dishonesty, in any form, will not be tolerated. This includes, but is not limited to, having someone else bring your clicker to class, using multiple people's clickers during class, copying a classmate's work, allowing a classmate to copy your work, having someone else turn in a quiz for you, turning in a quiz for someone who was not there, modifying an exam after it has been handed back in an attempt to deceive the instructor into believing the assignment was graded incorrectly, using cell phone during an exam. A student found guilty of academic dishonesty will receive an automatic E on the assignment, and in some cases the offense may lead to an E for the course, academic probation, or even expulsion. See sections 6.3.1 and 6.3.2 of the University Senate Rules for more information regarding academic integrity.


Classroom decorum and civility:

Students are expected to be actively participating during class. Students are also expected not to distract others. If you arrive late, leave early, are distracted by your phone, or are otherwise not actively engaged with the class you may not receive credit for participating that day. If you are disrupting class, you may be asked to leave.

College-level mathematics can be very difficult, and many of your classmates will be having a hard time adjusting both to the university and to the demands of the class. You are expected to treat your classmates with respect. It is reasonable to disagree, but you should express your disagreement respectfully. Personal attacks or statements denigrating another on the basis of race, sex, religion, sexual orientation, gender or gender expression, age, national/regional origin or other such irrelevant factors are considered a severe disruption. Harassment will not be tolerated.


Non-Discrimination Statement and Title IX Information:

The University of Kentucky faculty are committed to supporting students and upholding the University's non-discrimination policy. Discrimination is prohibited at UK. If you experience an incident of discrimination we encourage you to report it to Institutional Equity & Equal Opportunity (IEEO) Office, 13 Main Building, (859) 257-8927. Refer to this DEI statement for details on the University of Kentucky's commitment to diversity and inclusion.

Acts of Sex- and Gender-Based Discrimination or Interpersonal Violence: If you experience an incident of sex- or gender-based discrimination or interpersonal violence, we encourage you to report it. While you may talk to a faculty member or TA/RA/GA, understand that as a "Responsible Employee" of the University these individuals MUST report any acts of violence (including verbal bullying and sexual harassment) to the University's Title IX Coordinator in the IEEO Office. If you would like to speak with someone who may be able to afford you confidentiality, the Violence Intervention and Prevention (VIP) program and Bias Incident Support Services (Frazee Hall 窶 Lower Level), the Counseling Center (106 Frazee Hall), and University Health Services are confidential resources on campus.

Technical Support

Support. If you experience technical issues with Canvas, visit https://www.uky.edu/canvas for assistance or call customer service at (859) 218-4357. If you experience technical issues with WeBWork or Piazza, contact your professor.

Expectations for Student Work

For any written solutions to problems in this course, students are expected to submit work that is clear, legible, and well-written. Students should show all their work in an organized manner, using complete sentences to explain their solutions and justify their computations.

Study Advice and Getting Help

Mathematics is not a spectator sport. To understand what this means, consider how well you might learn to play football by merely watching Cristiano Ronaldo, or learn to sing by only listening to Adele. Similarly, you will not learn the material in this course by doing just enough to get the correct answer on the homework. In order to learn, you must attend all lectures and take notes, actively read the textbook, work a large number of problems, discuss problems with your classmates, and reflect on your work. The instructor's role is that of a coach or guide who will help you learn as much of the material as you desire. This being said, form good study skills from the start!

  • Read each section of the text prior to the lecture where it will be covered.
  • As you read the text, have pencil and paper handy. Work through the computations. Find examples to illustrate the theorems and results in the text. If the text tells you that every differentiable function is continuous, think of examples of differentiable functions and check if they are continuous. Think of examples of functions that are not continuous and determine if they are differentiable. Can you think of an example of a function that is continuous but not differentiable?
  • Begin the homework immediately after reading the new material from each section. Mathematics is cumulative. In order to benefit from chapter 3 material, you must understand chapter 1 material.
  • Form in person discussion groups or online discussion groups on Piazza or Canvas. Spend time discussing problems.
  • Do not fall behind. It is very difficult to catch up in a math class after falling behind.
  • Begin preparing for exams well in advance. Read the lecture notes, text and supplementary materials again to review all of the material to be covered on the exam. Be sure you are familiar with the main results and theorems and how they are used in homework.
  • Work additional problems to prepare for the exam. Use old exams from previous semesters of MA 123 to take a practice test. Treat it like a test. Compare your solutions with those provided by the answer key.
  • If you are having trouble, then seek help immediately.

Grading

You may access your course grades through the Canvas system, logging in with your linkblue ID and password. Your grade in the course will be determined as follows:

Activity Percentage of Grade
3 Common Hour Exams 20% Each
Final Exam (cumulative) 20%
Web Homework (WebWork) 15%
Recitation 5%
Total 100%

Minimum Overall Percentage Final Grade
90% A
80% B
70% C
60% D
0% E

THE GRADING SCALE IS STRICT.

Exam Information



Exam Schedule


MA123 has common hour exams, including its final exam.



Click here for the room schedule for exam 4.





Refer to the alternate exam instructions for requesting an alternate exam for university excused conflict.

Each exam is worth 100 points. Each exam will have two short answer questions for a total of 10 points and 18 multiple choice questions for a total of 90 points. You must bring a photo ID to each exam and you may use a calculator on the exams. We allow the same calculators as the ACT allows; no Computer Algebra System (CAS), no network (data or wifi), no camera. Absolutely no cell phone use during an exam is allowed. The final exam, Exam 4, will be comprehensive.

After an exam is given, you should go back over the exam and redo problems you got wrong. Due to the cumulative nature of this course, it is worth your time to learn from your mistakes promptly.



MA123 Old Exams

Exams from previous semesters can be found here. These are not practice exams, they are exams given during prior semesters.

Spring 2019 Exam 1
Solutions
Exam 2
Solutions
Exam 3
Solutions
Exam 4
Solutions
Fall 2018 Exam 1
Solutions
Exam 2
Solutions
Exam 3
Solutions
Exam 4
Solutions
Spring 2018 Exam 1
Solutions
Exam 2
Solutions
Exam 3
Solutions
Exam 4
Solutions
Fall 2017 Exam 1
Solutions
Exam 2
Solutions
Exam 3
Solutions
Exam 4
Solutions
Spring 2017 Exam 1
Solutions
Exam 2
Solutions
Exam 3
Solutions
Exam 4
Solutions
Fall 2016 Exam 1
Solutions
Exam 2
Solutions
Exam 3
Solutions
Exam 4
Solutions
Spring 2016 Exam 1
Solutions
Exam 2
Solutions
Exam 3
Solutions
Exam 4
Solutions
Fall 2015 Exam 1
Solutions
Exam 2
Solutions
Exam 3
Solutions
Exam 4
Solutions

Caution: The exact content of the exams may vary from semester to semester. Some new material has been added and some types of questions might be deleted. Nevertheless, the old exams still serve as a rough guide to the material. For all material, we rely on the Course Text, Web Homework and Recitation Worksheets to prepare exams.

In particular, the content for Chapter 7 has changed starting in Fall 2018. This affects parts of Exam 2 and the final. For Chapter 7 material, be especially sure to use the Course Text, Web Homework and Recitation Worksheets to practice the material. Also, on the old exams, you can skip any question involving the summation notation Σ.

Several versions of the exam are given during each sitting of the exam. The different versions contain essentially the same problems, but the data in the problems are different from version to version. Detailed solutions are provided for only one version of each exam.



Alternate exams

Students who have university excused absences or who have university-scheduled class conflicts with uniform examinations may take the Alternate Exam. You must fill out the Alternate Exam Request Form at least two weeks before the scheduled exam. Click here for instructions on filling out the alternate exam form.

No final exams will be given before Wednesday, May 3 at 6pm.


Missing an exam:

Absences from exams should be reported (in advance) on this form. Students who have university excused absences or who have university-scheduled class conflicts with uniform examinations need to make arrangements to take exam at an alternate time. According to university policy, it is the student's responsibility to resolve scheduling conflicts with common hour exams, and this must be done at least TWO WEEKS before the exam. If you fail to inform your instructor of exam conflicts in timely manner, a penalty may be assessed on your exam score and you will be required to take the exam at one of the already scheduled alternate exam times. To avoid any problems request alternate exams here as soon as you know you may have a conflict.

If you do not inform your instructor or fill out the alternate exam form until after the scheduled exam date, a penalty of 5% will be assessed on your exam score for each day after the exam date that you do not communicate your absence.


No final exams will be given before Wednesday, May 3 at 6pm.

Online Homework (Webwork)

Homework is turned in on WeBWork, our online homework system. You can access WeBWork using the Assignments tab in your Canvas course. We strongly recommend using Chrome or Firefox as the web browser. Sometimes students using Safari will have problems, but not always.

Once you submit your answer to a problem and see the green "correct" notification, you are done with that problem. You do not need to submit the entire assignment. WeBWork will sync your grade with Canvas as you complete each problem.

You have unlimited tries for each problem up until the close date given in the Homework Schedule. For each homework deadline below, the homework will close at 11:59pm on the date given. After the due date, you can receive 80% credit until the reduced scoring period ends. Refer to Webwork for the reduced scoring due date. Occasionally we may announce a homework extension for the entire class; be sure to check Canvas for announcements.

Due At 11:59pm On Given Date

The document Entering Answers in WeBWorK gives more information about how to enter mathematics to answer questions in WeBWorK. Please contact your lecturer or teaching assistant if you have difficulty logging in.

The homework score will be computed as follows. There are 222 points available in the homework problems throughout the course. Your end of term homework grade will be computed by dividing the number of points you earn throughout the semester by 222. The max homework score is 100%. There is a reduced scoring option where you can complete problems after the due date for 80% credit. The reduced scoring period for exams 1 - 3 ends at 4:00pm on the day of the exam. For example, you can work on homework 1-7 after the closing date until 4:00pm on Thursday, February 9 for 80% credit. The reduced scoring period for homework 22-24 ends at 11:59pm on April 27.

Late web homework will not be accepted. If you have an unusual situation that prevents you from completing web homework, please contact your instructor. However, in general students will be expected to complete web homework even if they are traveling or if they have a minor illness.

Suggestions for working on web homework:

  • Print out the web homework and write out complete solutions of problems before attempting to submit answers. These solutions will be helpful in studying for exams and to bring to discussions with others.
  • Form a discussion group and meet regularly to discuss web homework and the material covered in the lecture notes and text.
  • Make sure you understand your solution to each homework problem. Discuss your approach with members of your discussion group, your instructor, or tutors.
  • Do not guess. If you submit an answer and are marked wrong, look through your solution for computational and conceptual errors.

Piazza

Piazza is a group discussion board that you will use to ask homework questions and answer discussion questions. Piazza has usefull features like a math tool and the ability to post screen shots. You can find a link to Piazza in our Canvas course on the side tool bar. You should read the posting guidelines which are pinned to the top of the discussion history. Following the guidelines will allow the instructor to better assist you and will make information easier to find for everyone.

Recitation

You are required to attend a recitation section. In Math 123, recitations serve as a kind of lab; they are an opportunity to look at problems more in-depth than we sometimes have time to in lecture, to work with other students, and to take quizzes or do other graded work.


MA123 Recitation Schedule and Worksheets


(See the Sections and Instructors page to look up your recitation according to your section number.)
Talk to your recitation instructor to find out policies and procedures specific to your section. Material for recitations will include the worksheets below.

Tentative Recitation Schedule

Worksheet 1A, 1B
Worksheet 2A, 2B
Worksheet 3A, 3B
Worksheet 4A, 4B
Worksheet 5A, 5B
Worksheet 6A, 6B
Worksheet 7
Worksheet 8A, 8B, 8C, 8D
Worksheet 9
Worksheet 10A, 10B
Worksheet 11A, 11B
Worksheet 12A, 12B, 12C

Quizzes

There will be almost weekly quizzes in recitation. Refer to the Tentative Recitation Schedule for the information covered in each recitation. You can find an overview of what will be on each quiz in the weekly Canvas announcements. The quizzes begin on Tuesday, January 17. There are no quizzes during exam weeks, but attendance will be taken.